sixpenceee:

KENNY: THE INBRED TIGER WITH “DOWN SYNDROME”

Pictures have been circulating the internet about a white tiger with down syndrome. Kenny’s diagnosis of down syndrome is questionable. But what is sure is that he was a victim of inbreeding. White tigers are rare and to ensure that the offspring would be a white tiger, Kenny’s parents were brother and sister. A lot of his siblings were stillborns or died very young.

But despite all this, breeders kept trying to mate Kenny’s parents. When parents are very closely related, there is a higher chance of both parents carrying the same “bad” gene. So there is a greater risk for their child to have a dominant bad gene. 

Kenny lived to be 10 years old. Kenny was described as non-aggressive and very friendly. 

SOURCE & SOURCE

runwayward:

Backstage at Prada

runwayward:

Backstage at Prada

eeyorefanblog:

do you ever like someone so much. you just imagine all the things you could do together and you just constantly think about that person almost every breathing minute and just wish you could be together

Zoe Saldana photographed for Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, September 2012

fertile-mind-seeks-water:

youngblackandvegan:

Do not allow people to mispronounce your name

This.

blackgirlwhiteboylove:

jessehimself:

Autum Ashante was accepted into the University of Connecticut at age 13.
Stephen R. Stafford II entered Morehouse College at the age 11 with three majors. 
Tony Hansberry II at age 14 developed a time reducing method for hysterectomies at Shands Hospital 
Honor them by sharing this post.

Black excellence

blackgirlwhiteboylove:

jessehimself:

Autum Ashante was accepted into the University of Connecticut at age 13.

Stephen R. Stafford II entered Morehouse College at the age 11 with three majors. 

Tony Hansberry II at age 14 developed a time reducing method for hysterectomies at Shands Hospital 

Honor them by sharing this post.

Black excellence

theorlandojones:

This is a very serious disease* so I gladly accept the “bucket challenge”

*My heart goes out to all those who struggle with ALS but I am, of course, talking about the disease of apathy.  If (and hopefully when) Michael Brown’s killer is brought to justice and convicted of 1st degree murder, it still won’t prevent this from happening again. We cannot accept this as the status quo. We MUST continue the fight at the ballot box, in the media and by working to create systemic change. I’m not naive to the dirty politics (redistricting, voter ID requirements, etc) that will try to prevent us from our goal. But I refuse to give up hope. My “bullet bucket challenge” is not about pointing fingers and it’s not about being angry. Every shell casing in that bucket represents the life of someone who fought and died in the goal for civil rights and human dignity. As a member of law enforcement (yes I really am a reserve sheriff) I will not stand idly by while others violate civil and human rights under the cover of authority and I will insist that other good cops rise to the same standard as well. As a black man I will demand more from myself and my community. I will not allow outsiders to co-opt our struggle in order to commit violence in our name. I’m channeling my outrage into action so I no longer feel powerless. It’s not about black or white. It’s not about rich or poor. It’s about us vs. them. There are more of us — from all races, genders and identities — then there will ever be of them. And we will be victorious.

"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality"

Join me.